Accident insurance for passengers in public transport

For the purposes of the Law on Compulsory Traffic Insurance (RS Official Gazette, No 51/2009, 78/2011, 101/2011, 93/2012 and 7/2013- Decision of the Constitutional Court), the types of compulsory traffic insurance shall be as follows:

  1. Accident insurance of passengers in public transport
  2. Third party liability insurance for owners of motor vehicles
  3. Aircraft passenger and third-party liability insurance for aircraft owners
  4. Third party boat insurance for boat owners.

The owner of the motor vehicles, aircraft and boat shall also include any user or other person registered as the owner of the means of transport in accordance with law.

Insurance against liability for damage caused to third parties concluded by the owner of the means of transport shall cover, under the conditions and in the way provided by the Law on Compulsory Traffic Insurance (RS Official Gazette, No 51/2009, 78/2011, 101/2011, 93/2012 and 7/2013- Decision of the Constitutional Court), the damages to third persons made by the means of transport, regardless of who was in the driver’s seat. Continue reading Accident insurance for passengers in public transport

Opening a company and doing business in Slovenia

You can expand your business in Slovenia by opening the appropriate type of company.

As a natural person, a foreign citizen has the opportunity to establish a company in Slovenia, most often in the legal form of a limited liability company or to operate as an independent entrepreneur (s.p.).

Provided that they already have an existing company (LTD) abroad, foreign citizens also can register a subsidiary or a branch office of the parent company.

Independent entrepreneur (s.p.).

An individual can do business in Slovenia under his name if he registers as an independent entrepreneur (s.p.). Continue reading Opening a company and doing business in Slovenia

Liquidated damages

A creditor and a debtor may stipulate that the debtor shall pay to the creditor a specific sum or supply him with some other property benefit, should he fail to perform his non-monetary obligation, or delay in performing it (liquidated damages).

Unless something else results from contract, liquidated damages shall be considered as stipulated for the case of a debtor becoming late in performance.

Liquidated damages shall not be stipulated in relation to monetary obligations.

Method of Calculation

Contracting parties may determine the amount of liquidated damages as they please, either in form of a lump sum or as a percentage, or for each day of delay, or in some other way. Continue reading Liquidated damages